Cuban K-12 Education (#2)

800px-cuban_school_children

Similar to the United States, the typical school starting age in Cuba is 5-6 years old, however, unlike the United States, you´re typically done with secondary education at age 15-16. As a result of the Dictatorship in Cuba, all students in k-12  grades are required to self identify by wearing school uniforms that identifies what grade they’re currently in. (Exp. All student is grade 7 will wear one color whereas all students in grade 8 will wear another.) There are three primary principals that students must abide by when attending k-12 in Cuba. They are;

  • Hard work
  • Self-discipline
  • Love of Country!

Unlike in the United States, in Cuba- Secondary Education is divided into two sectors. Regular Secondary Education and Pre-University Secondary Education or technical training to learn a trade. Students who complete the pre-university track are awarded the Bachillerato and students who complete the technical track are awarded the skills needed to enter into the “trade” world.

I decided to study education in Cuba because it has been a plan of mine since I was a sophomore in high school to also develop a career in Education. One day when I’m instructing my students on various Hispanic Countries around the world, I plan to introduce my students to the various aspects of the educational system around the world and show similarities and differences related to the United States.

WORKS CITED

Mandrapa, N. (2015, May 21). Education System of Cuba – Path to Success. Retrieved October 17, 2016, from https://novakdjokovicfoundation.org/education-system-of-cuba-path-to-success/

Education System in Cuba. (2012). Retrieved October 17, 2016, from http://www.classbase.com/countries/Cuba/Education-System

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s